English translation and classical reception : towards a new literary history / Stuart Gillespie.

By: Gillespie, Stuart, 1958-Contributor(s): Wiley InterScience (Online service)Material type: TextTextSeries: Classical receptionsPublication details: Chichester, West Sussex ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2011Description: 1 online resource (ix, 208 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781444396485; 144439648X; 9781444396508; 1444396501Subject(s): Classical literature -- Translations into English -- History and criticism | Classical literature -- Appreciation -- Great Britain -- History | English literature -- Classical influences | Translating and interpreting -- Great Britain -- History | Classical literature -- Appreciation -- Great Britain -- History | Classical literature -- Translations into English -- History and criticism | English literature -- Classical influences | Translating and interpreting -- Great Britain -- History | LITERARY CRITICISM -- European -- English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh | Classical literature -- Appreciation | Classical literature -- Translations into English | English literature -- Classical influences | Translating and interpreting | Great BritainGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | History.Additional physical formats: No title; No title; No titleDDC classification: 820.9/142 LOC classification: PR133 | .G55 2011Online resources: Wiley Online Library
Contents:
Front Matter -- Making the Classics Belong: A Historical Introduction -- Creative Translation -- English Renaissance Poets and the Translating Tradition -- Two-Way Reception: Shakespeare's Influence on Plutarch -- Transformative Translation: Dryden's Horatian Ode -- Statius and the Aesthetics of Eighteenth-Century Poetry -- Classical Translation and the Formation of the English Literary Canon -- Evidence for an Alternative History: Manuscript Translations of the Long Eighteenth Century -- Receiving Wordsworth, Receiving Juvenal: Wordsworth's Suppressed Eighth Satire -- The Persistence of Translations: Lucretius in the Nineteenth Century -- ₁Oddity and struggling dumbness₂: Ted Hughes's Homer -- Afterword -- References -- Index of Ancient Authors and Passages -- General Index.
Making the classics belong: a historical introduction -- Creative translation -- English Renaissance poets and the translating tradition -- Two-way reception: Shakespeare's influence on Plutarch -- Transformative translation: Dryden's Horatian ode -- Statius and the aesthetics of eighteenth-century poetry -- Classical translation and the formation of the English literary canon -- Evidence for an alternative history: manuscript translations of the long eighteenth century -- Receiving Wordsworth, receiving Juvenal: Wordsworth's suppressed eighth satire -- The persistence of translations: Lucretius in the nineteenth century -- Oddity and struggling dumbness: Ted Hughes's Homer.
Summary: English Translation and Classical Reception is the first genuine cross-disciplinary study bringing English literary history to bear on questions about the reception of classical literary texts, and vice versa. The text draws on the author's exhaustive knowledge of the subject from the early Renaissance to the present. The first book-length study of English translation as a topic in classical reception Draws on the author's exhaustive knowledge of English literary translation from the early Renaissance to the presentArgues for a remapping of English literary history which would take proper acco.
List(s) this item appears in: English Literature
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Front Matter -- Making the Classics Belong: A Historical Introduction -- Creative Translation -- English Renaissance Poets and the Translating Tradition -- Two-Way Reception: Shakespeare's Influence on Plutarch -- Transformative Translation: Dryden's Horatian Ode -- Statius and the Aesthetics of Eighteenth-Century Poetry -- Classical Translation and the Formation of the English Literary Canon -- Evidence for an Alternative History: Manuscript Translations of the Long Eighteenth Century -- Receiving Wordsworth, Receiving Juvenal: Wordsworth's Suppressed Eighth Satire -- The Persistence of Translations: Lucretius in the Nineteenth Century -- ₁Oddity and struggling dumbness₂: Ted Hughes's Homer -- Afterword -- References -- Index of Ancient Authors and Passages -- General Index.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Making the classics belong: a historical introduction -- Creative translation -- English Renaissance poets and the translating tradition -- Two-way reception: Shakespeare's influence on Plutarch -- Transformative translation: Dryden's Horatian ode -- Statius and the aesthetics of eighteenth-century poetry -- Classical translation and the formation of the English literary canon -- Evidence for an alternative history: manuscript translations of the long eighteenth century -- Receiving Wordsworth, receiving Juvenal: Wordsworth's suppressed eighth satire -- The persistence of translations: Lucretius in the nineteenth century -- Oddity and struggling dumbness: Ted Hughes's Homer.

Print version record.

English Translation and Classical Reception is the first genuine cross-disciplinary study bringing English literary history to bear on questions about the reception of classical literary texts, and vice versa. The text draws on the author's exhaustive knowledge of the subject from the early Renaissance to the present. The first book-length study of English translation as a topic in classical reception Draws on the author's exhaustive knowledge of English literary translation from the early Renaissance to the presentArgues for a remapping of English literary history which would take proper acco.

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