Islamic activism and U.S. foreign policy / Scott W. Hibbard and David Little.

By: Hibbard, Scott W, 1962-Contributor(s): Little, David, 1933-Material type: TextTextSeries: Perspectives seriesPublication details: Washington, D.C. : United States Institute of Peace Press, 1997. Description: xxvii, 137 p. ; 23 cmOther title: Islamic activism and United States foreign policy | Islamic activism and US foreign policySubject(s): Terrorism -- Islamic countries -- Prevention | Political violence -- Islamic countries -- Prevention | Islam and politics -- Islamic countries -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Foreign relations -- Islamic countries | Islamic countries -- Foreign relations -- United StatesDDC classification: 327.73017671 LOC classification: JZ1480.A55 | H53 1997Summary: For many in the West, political violence in Algeria, the Middle East, and elsewhere has come to symbolize the threat of "Islamic activism." Western governments, however, must deal with the challenge of extremism in the broader context of their relations with diverse states with contrasting histories, geographies, and peoples. To assess this challenge, the Institute brought together a distinguished group of policy analysts, practitioners, and scholars for a series of frank discussions. The sessions analyzed the nature of Islamic activism - including moderate political parties and militant extremists - and the options for policymakers to mitigate violence in a range of cases.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Books Books Library, Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB)
IMT Shelves (Level 4)
Non-fiction 327.73017671 H6241i 1997 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) 1 Available 021804
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. 113-133).

For many in the West, political violence in Algeria, the Middle East, and elsewhere has come to symbolize the threat of "Islamic activism." Western governments, however, must deal with the challenge of extremism in the broader context of their relations with diverse states with contrasting histories, geographies, and peoples. To assess this challenge, the Institute brought together a distinguished group of policy analysts, practitioners, and scholars for a series of frank discussions. The sessions analyzed the nature of Islamic activism - including moderate political parties and militant extremists - and the options for policymakers to mitigate violence in a range of cases.