Chinese perceptions of traditional and nontraditional security threats / Susan L. Craig.

By: Craig, Susan LContributor(s): Army War College (U.S.). Strategic Studies InstituteMaterial type: TextTextPublication details: Carlisle, PA : Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, [2007]Description: ix, 163 p. : map ; 23 cmISBN: 158487287X; 9781584872870Subject(s): National security -- China | China -- Military policy | China -- Foreign relations -- 1976-Additional physical formats: Chinese perceptions of traditional and nontraditional security threatsElectronic version also available on the SSI website.
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. Traditional security threats -- 3. Nontraditional security threats -- 4. Conclusion.
Summary: To understand the motivations and decisions of China's leadership and to behave in a manner so that we can influence them, we must try to understand the world as China does. This research is an attempt to do so by examining the writings and opinions of China's scholars, journalists and leaders--its "influential elite." China has a comprehensive concept of national security that includes not only defending its sovereignty and territorial integrity, but continuing its economic and social development and maintaining its international stature. The two main types of threats to China's national security are traditional and nontraditional. The United States, Japan, and India are traditional threats, considered willing and able to endanger all three components of China's national security. While military containment is a concern, the possibility for economic and diplomatic containment from any or all of these countries is more worrisome. Even more troublesome are nontraditional threats. Military deterrence and diplomatic skill have successfully managed traditional threats to date, but these are insufficient for overcoming nontraditional threats. An examination of China's social and economic disparities, environmental degradation, and energy insecurity demonstrates that to overcome nontraditional threats, China's leadership must not only look outward in efforts to foster cooperation, they must also look inward and make serious internal reforms.
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Books Books Independent University Bangladesh, Library.
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355.34330951 C8861c 2007 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) 01 Available 021718
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355.0335 A729 1999 Arming the future : 355.033573 K59m 2007 Making war to keep peace / 355.3310924 M2683a 1978 American Caesar : 355.34330951 C8861c 2007 Chinese perceptions of traditional and nontraditional security threats / 355.4 C353c 2008 Conflicts that changed the world / 355.4 H6762 2006 Hitting first : 355.6220973 W417s 1992 Small wars, big defense :

"March 2007."

Includes bibliographical references (p. 135-162).

1. Introduction -- 2. Traditional security threats -- 3. Nontraditional security threats -- 4. Conclusion.

To understand the motivations and decisions of China's leadership and to behave in a manner so that we can influence them, we must try to understand the world as China does. This research is an attempt to do so by examining the writings and opinions of China's scholars, journalists and leaders--its "influential elite." China has a comprehensive concept of national security that includes not only defending its sovereignty and territorial integrity, but continuing its economic and social development and maintaining its international stature. The two main types of threats to China's national security are traditional and nontraditional. The United States, Japan, and India are traditional threats, considered willing and able to endanger all three components of China's national security. While military containment is a concern, the possibility for economic and diplomatic containment from any or all of these countries is more worrisome. Even more troublesome are nontraditional threats. Military deterrence and diplomatic skill have successfully managed traditional threats to date, but these are insufficient for overcoming nontraditional threats. An examination of China's social and economic disparities, environmental degradation, and energy insecurity demonstrates that to overcome nontraditional threats, China's leadership must not only look outward in efforts to foster cooperation, they must also look inward and make serious internal reforms.

Electronic version also available on the SSI website.

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